TWU

TEST CASE HEARING OF DELIVERY RIDER AT FAIR WORK COMMISSION

Release date: 11/10/2018

TWU MEDIA RELEASE, 11 October 2018
 
A landmark case involving the sacking of a food delivery rider will be held at the Fair Work Commission in Sydney today.

TWU lawyers will cross-examine Foodora executives and insist that delivery riders have rights - including against unfair sackings.
 


“We are defending food delivery rider Josh Klooger over his unfair sacking which occurred after he spoke out about pay and conditions at Foodora. Not only did Foodora take away his rights, they engaged in widespread wage theft and non-payment of superannuation of thousands of riders while they operated in Australia. Today we are holding them to account over this and standing up for riders’ rights and rights for other workers in the on-demand economy,” said TWU’s Tony Sheldon, ahead of the hearing.
 
“Every day delivery riders are being swindled. They are denied minimum rates, superannuation, annual leave and sick leave. They are forced to compete against each other for shifts and even work these shifts for no pay at all. Companies refuse to cover riders when they are injured on the job or get their bikes stolen or damaged. The Fair Work Ombudsman has dropped their case against Foodora while the Federal Government is refusing to step in and defend workers in Australia,” he added.
 
“We support the actions of Uber drivers in London who went on strike this week to protest over low pay and unfair sackings. This kind of action is inevitable as tech billionaires and their stooges in governments refuse to listen to the demands of workers,” Sheldon said.
 
Foodora potentially owes the Australian Taxation Office and Revenue NSW millions of dollars after they investigated the company over unpaid wages, super and taxes. Foodora in August announced it was leaving Australia and appointed external administrators. A creditors meeting will take place in the coming months.
 
Hundreds of riders have protests in Sydney and Melbourne this year demanding rights.
 
A survey of riders has shown three out of every four riders are paid below minimum rates.
 
The rider survey also found:
 
  • Almost 50% of riders had either been injured on the job or knew someone who had.
  • Over 70% of riders said they should get entitlements such as sick leave.
  • 1 in 4 riders (26%) work full time hours (40+ hours per week).
  • 3 in 4 (76%) riders work 20 or more hours per week.
  • Over 26% work more than 40 hours a week.
  • The average age is just under 26 years.


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